Conditions

Arthritis

If a patient begins to feel pain and stiffness anywhere in their body or to have trouble moving around, it could be arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in the joints. Over time, a swollen joint can become severely damaged.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome starts gradually with a slight aching in the wrist that can extend to the hand and forearm. Patients can treat carpal tunnel syndrome with a variety of procedures, including endoscopic carpel tunnel release surgery.

Cataracts

A cataract is a cloudiness of the normally transparent eye lens. It can cause a decrease in vision and may lead to eventual blindness.

Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

Conjunctivitis, more commonly referred to as “pink eye,” is an inflammation or infection of the transparent membrane (conjunctiva) that lines the eyelid and part of the eyeball.

Corneal Dystrophy

Corneal dystrophies are genetic eye disorders that occur when abnormal material gathers in the cornea. Examples include macular corneal dystrophy, map-dot-fingerprint dystrophy and Fuchs’ dystrophy.

Corneal Infections

A corneal infection, or keratitis, occurs when the cornea is damaged by a foreign object, by bacteria or by fungi from a contaminated contact lens. Keratitis can cause painful inflammation and lead to corneal scarring.

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy refers to any damage that occurs to the eye’s retina in conjunction with long-term diabetes. (Retinopathy refers to any non-inflammatory disease of the retina.) Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness among American adults.

Droopy Eyelids (Ocular Plastics)

Some conditions, like droopy eyelids, can gradually interfere with your eyesight. Not only do droopy eyelids make you look sad or tired, they can actually limit your field of vision.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States, and there are an estimated 6 million cases worldwide. Glaucoma occurs when eye pressure increases and creates stress on the optic nerve. If the nerve is damaged, vision loss occurs

Keratoconus

Keratoconus is a progressive thinning of the cornea and is the most common cornea dystrophy in the United States, affecting one in every 2,000.

Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in Americans who are 60 or older. Macular degeneration damages a person’s central vision, which is needed to see objects clearly, read and drive

Ocular Herpes

Ocular herpes is a recurrent viral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. In fact, it is the most common infectious cause of corneal blindness in the country.

Orthopedic Injuries

If you break, sprain or otherwise injure a bone, the symptoms may not always be clear. The area may be bruised or swollen, even if at first glance it is unclear whether there is a fracture. Patients can also experience numbing, tingling or even paralysis below the fracture. Sprains can occur in any joint, and even though the joint continues to function normally, there should be some swelling, pain and tenderness.

Osteoporosis

Anyone can develop osteoporosis, which makes bones brittle and more likely to break, but it is more common in older women. This disease progresses silently, and, in fact, most people remain undiagnosed until a bone breaks.

Periocular Skin Cancer

When skin cancer is near your eyes, it is called periocular skin cancer. Skin cancer can arise from any of the types of cells in your skin. The most common form is basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Both basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma are relatively slow growing.

Posterior Vitreous Detachment

Posterior Vitreous Detachment (PVD) is a common eye condition where the vitreous separates from the retina. Normally the vitreous, the clear gel-like substance within the eye, is in direct contact with the retina. As the eye ages, the vitreous tends to get more liquid, so PVD is a normal part of the aging process.

Pterygium

Pterygium (pronounced tur-IJ-ee-um) is a common eye condition that affects people who spend a lot of time outdoors. Pterygium is also known as surfer’s eye because of its common occurrence in surfers. Individuals with pterygium have a growth of pink, fleshy tissue on the white of the eye. This growth usually forms on the side of the eye closest to the nose.

Refractive Errors (Vision Problems)

Most common vision problems are caused by refractive errors – the eye’s inability to focus, or refract, light correctly on the retina (the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of the eye). Refractive disorders are usually the result of an eyeball that is too short or too long, a cornea (the clear front part of your eye) that is irregularly shaped or a lens that is curved too much or too little.

Retinal Detachment

The retina is the light-sensitive layer of tissue that lines the inside of the eye, sending visual messages through the optic nerve to the brain. When detached, the retina is lifted or pulled from its normal position.

Shingles

Shingles is a disease caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Once a patient has chickenpox, the virus stays in the body, and, as some people age, it may reappear as shingles. Shingles is not contagious - you can't “catch it.” In about 40 percent of people with shingles, the cornea will be affected.

Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) is a rare, serious disorder of the skin and mucous membranes. SJS can cause serious eye problems, such as severe conjunctivitis; iritis, an inflammation inside the eye; corneal blisters and erosions; and corneal holes. In some cases it can lead to severe vision loss.